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Sydney Brenner

USA
Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Professor Sydney Brenner was born in South Africa and educated at the University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (Medicine and Science). He went to Oxford and received a degree of D.Phil., in 1952 working in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory. After a brief return to South Africa, he joined the MRC Unit in the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge in 1956 and went on to serve as director of that lab's successor, the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge from 1979 to 1987. In 1987 he became Director of the MRC Unit of Molecular Genetics retiring in 1992 from the MRC. In 1996 Dr. Brenner founded the Molecular Sciences Institute in Berkeley, California. He is now Distinguished Professor at The Salk Institute, La Jolla, California. He is also associated with the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Singapore; Janelia Farm Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, USA and Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Japan. Dr. Brenner's early research was in molecular genetics, working with bacteriophages and bacteria; he discovered messenger RNA (with Francois Jacob and Matthew Meselson) and, with Francis Crick, showed that the code was composed of triplets. In the 1960s he changed direction and initiated his research on C. elegans, establishing it as a powerful experimental system for the analysis of complex biological processes. As a geneticist, he saw that the techniques of cloning and sequencing would open up new ways of approaching genetics. He turned to studying vertebrate genomics and has established the pufferfish genome as a powerful tool in genome analysis. He pioneered the high-throughput and low-cost DNA sequencing strategy by inventing the microbead array-based 'Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS)' technique. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2002 was awarded jointly to Sydney Brenner, H. Robert Horvitz and John E. Sulston 'for their discoveries concerning 'genetic regulation of organ development and programmed cell death''.

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Speaker
  • Grégoire Altan-Bonnet, PhD
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  • Sydney Brenner
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  • Jan B. Hoek, PhD
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  • Peter Hunter
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  • Markus Löffler
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  • Denis Noble
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  • Jacques Prost
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  • Ivo F. Sbalzarini
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  • Pieter Rein ten Wolde
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  • Joseph Lehar
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Media Cooperations
 
BioMed Central  (London/UK)